Trump-Kim Meeting: North Korea is Yet to Respond

An elated North Korean Leader Kim Jong-un Meets the chief South Korean of delegates KoreaChung Eui-yong, the national security adviser to South Korean President Moon Jae-in Photo: KCNA
An elated North Korean Leader Kim Jong-un Meets the chief South Korean of delegates KoreaChung Eui-yong, the national security adviser to South Korean President Moon Jae-in Photo: KCNA

South Korea said it has not yet received a North Korean response about the meeting between the U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

South Korea’s Ministry of Unification said, “We have not seen nor received an official response from the North Korean regime regarding the North Korea-US summit.”

“I feel they’re approaching this matter with caution and they need time to organize their stance,” a spokesperson of the Ministry of Unification told the press.

The White House confirmed on 8 March that the U.S. President Donald Trump agreed to meet the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

The sudden announcement of the meeting has alarmed many politicians and diplomats in Washington DC as they fear Kim Jong-un might try to buy time to proliferate his nuclear ambition a bit further by dint of this meeting procedures.

On March 8, South Korea’s National Security Advisor Chung Eui-Yong told the press after a meeting with the U.S. President Donald Trump that the U.S. President “would meet Kim Jong-un by May to achieve permanent denuclearization.”

Mr. Eui-Yong said North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “expressed his eagerness to meet President Trump as soon as possible.”

President Trump said in a tweet on the same day that “Meeting being planned!”

 “The deal with North Korea is very much in the making and will be, if completed, a very good one for the World. Time and place to be determined,” President Trump again tweeted on March 9.

Many of the U.S. lawmakers have been worried about the meeting President Trump has been planning since he received an invitation from Kim.

“The worst-case outcome for U.S. is also the most likely — a great, legitimizing photo op for Kim, and no material commitment on disarmament.”

The U.S. Senator Jack Reed of Rhode Island said, “Sitting at the table is the easy part. Solving this problem is hard.”

Connecticut’s Senator Chris Murphy said, “The worst-case outcome for U.S. is also the most likely — a great, legitimizing photo op for Kim, and no material commitment on disarmament.”

The CIA director Mike Pompeo, however, defended the Trump decision to meet the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Mr. Pompeo said the U.S. President understand the risks. He told the Fox News the President “isn’t doing this for theatre, he is going there to solve a problem.”

The South Korean President Moon Jae-in, however, has urged to involve China and Japan in the process to ensure peace in a turbulent region.

Mr. Moon described the talks with North Korea as a ‘precious chance to achieve permanent peace’.


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