Republican Tensions over Donald Trump’s Tarif Plans

Congressman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin speaking at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland. Photo: Gage Skidmore
Congressman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin speaking at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland. Photo: Gage Skidmore

The U.S. President Donald Trump’s plan to impose tariffs on metals has raised concern among the Republicans with Paul Ryan urging the president not to advance with this plan.

“We are extremely worried about the consequences of a trade war and are urging the White House to not advance with this plan,” Ryan spokeswoman AshLee Strong said in a statement on Monday.

“We are extremely worried about the consequences of a trade war and are urging the White House to not advance with this plan.”

“The new tax reform law has boosted the economy and we certainly don’t want to jeopardize those gains,” AshLee added.

Meanwhile, the President said he will not back down in spite of Ryan’s call on the White House to scrap tariff controversy.

Donald Trump told the reporters during a meeting with the Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, “We’re not backing down. I don’t think you’re going to have a trade war.”

A war of words over trade began with Trump vowing to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum on Thursday.

“When a country (USA) is losing many billions of dollars on trade with virtually every country it does business with, trade wars are good, and easy to win, President Trump tweeted.

 “When we are down $100 billion with a certain country and they get cute, don’t trade anymore-we win big. It’s easy!” Donald Trump said.

President Trump’s move was criticized by the U.S. trading partners including the European Union. The EU in response to President Trump’s move said it has been considering of a 25% tariff around $3.5 bn of imports from the U.S.

The WTO Director-General Roberto Azevedo said, “Once we start down this path it will be very difficult to reverse direction. An eye for an eye will leave us all blind and the world in a deep recession.”

“Once we start down this path it will be very difficult to reverse direction. An eye for an eye will leave us all blind and the world in a deep recession.”

Donald Trump hinted if the U.S. achieved better from NAFTA, he would abandon plans for tariffs for U.S. neighbors.

“We have large trade deficits with Mexico and Canada. NAFTA, which is under renegotiation right now, has been a bad deal for U.S.A. Massive relocation of companies & jobs. Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum will only come off if new & fair NAFTA agreement is signed,” Trump tweeted.

President Trump’s move, however, created concern among the Republicans. House Committee on Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady’s spokeswoman Lauren Aronson said in a statement, “As the two Chairmen have reinforced, the Administration and Congress must work together on trade policies that build off the momentum of the President’s tax cuts, which is why any tariffs should be narrow, targeted, and focused on addressing unfairly traded products, without disrupting the flow of fairly traded products for American businesses and consumers.”

“We think tailoring the tariffs strengthens the President’s hand in a major way and makes sure that American manufacturer workers aren’t caught up in unintended consequences of a broader tariff action by the President.”

Earlier on Monday Kevin Brady told the press, as CNN quoted him, “We think tailoring the tariffs strengthens the President’s hand in a major way and makes sure that American manufacturer workers aren’t caught up in unintended consequences of a broader tariff action by the President.”


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