Pakistan: Malala Returns Home

Malala Yousafzai is a campaigner who in 2012 was shot for her activist work. As part of WOW 2014, she talks about the systemic nature of gender inequality and bringing about change. Photo: WIkimedia Commons
Malala Yousafzai is a campaigner who in 2012 was shot for her activist work. As part of WOW 2014, she talks about the systemic nature of gender inequality and bringing about change. Photo: WIkimedia Commons

Youngest ever Nobel Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai has returned to Pakistan, her homeland, after almost six years.

She left Pakistan more than five years ago for medical treatment after the Pakistani Taliban shot her in the head.

The group threatened to kill her if she returns to Pakistan.

Upon her arrival in Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan, the Prime Minister of Pakistan Mr. Shahid Abbasi organized a ceremony in her honor.

Nobel Peace Laureate Malala was moved by the arrangements as she was seen wiping tears from her eyes during her speech.

Malala said: “I am very happy today, that after five and a half years I have set foot on my soil, in my nation again.”

“I am very happy, and I still can’t believe that this is actually happening. It is literally like a dream.

“I am 20 years old, but I have seen a lot in this life. From growing up in Swat Valley, such a beautiful region, and then seeing extremism and terrorism from 2007 until 2009, and seeing all the difficulties that women face in our society … and then the attack, to have to leave the country.

“Everything was happening by itself, I could not control anything. If it were up to me, I would never have left this country,” Malala said in an emotional speech.

Malala vowed to work for education after she recovered from injury. She has championed the rights of educations for all the children across the globe.

She founded Malala Fund in cooperation with her father; a Fund that spent more than $6 million for girl’s education in Pakistan.

In pursuit of higher education, 20 years old Malala is now studying Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Oxford University.

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Mr. Abbasi addressed Malala as ‘our daughter’ in his speech and appreciated her “fame throughout the world.”

Mr. Abbasi said: “There is no doubt that when you left here, you were a 13-year-old child, but as you have returned you are now one of the most famous Pakistanis.

“This is your home. You can return anytime you want,” the Pakistani Prime Minister Mr. Abbasi added.

The Pakistani Taliban shot her in the head in October 2012 for her stand against their ban on girls’ education in Swat Valley, Pakistan.

She survived and ever since has become an icon for girls’ education all across the globe.

Earlier in an interview, Malala said: “I really miss my friends and family. But I also miss the landscape.

“When I woke up in the hospital in the UK, I looked outside and asked the doctors where are the mountains and rivers. Swat Valley is a paradise on Earth, and I don’t think I fully appreciated its beauty until it wasn’t outside my window every day.”


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