Angela Merkel Forms Coalition Government with Social Democrats, again

"TV-Duell" Angela Merkel (CDU) - Martin Schulz (SPD): Bundestagswahl 2017 Photo: Karl-Ludwig Poggemann
"TV-Duell" Angela Merkel (CDU) - Martin Schulz (SPD): Bundestagswahl 2017 Photo: Karl-Ludwig Poggemann

The longest coalition-building process finally came to an end with Angela Merkel forming a government with Social Democrats (SPD), again.

The German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier has officially proposed Angela Merkel as the Chancellor to the lower house of the parliament.

The president wrote to the lower house of the parliament with his proposal. The Bundestag, upon setting a date believed to be on 14 March, will vote on Merkel’s candidacy.

The new Finance Minister will be a Social Democrat and SPD will decide six ministerial positions before the expected Bundestag vote on 14 March.

“I think it’s good for our country that this period of uncertainty is over,” German President Steinmeier said proposing Angela Merkel as Chancellor.

After a successful yet tiresome coalition formation with the SPD, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the new government needs to get to work quickly.

“Almost six months after the election, the people expect something to happen now,” Chancellor Merkel said.

“We see that… Europe faces challenges and that a strong voice from Germany, along with that of France and other member states, is necessary,” Merkel added.

Mrs. Merkel has vowed to work to secure jobs and prosperity of the German people. She pledged to ensure a strong voice for Germany in the European Union.

The German chancellor is set to form a fourth government after the Social Democrats voted in her favor.

Angela Merkel’s formation of the fourth government, however, was wearisome with Alternative for Germany (AfD) winning above 12% of the vote in the last election to eventually emerge as the main opposition party.

The result came as a shock for Angela Merkel as her party had its worst result in years in the 2017 national election.

“Europe faces challenges and that a strong voice from Germany, along with that of France and other member states, is necessary”

CDU won 246 seats in the Bundestag while the SPD, also had its worst result in years, won 153 seats in the parliament.

SPD has been in a coalition government with Angela Merkel’s CDU for 12 years. But the SPD leader Martin Schulz vowed not to get into another term of a coalition government with CDU after the party’s poor performance in the election.

The rise of the anti-immigrant Alternative for Deutschland (AfD) scared the major political parties including CDU and SPD.

The AfD won 94 seats in Bundestag, an unprecedented success for the right-wing party turned into the third biggest political party of Germany.

The Social Democrats (SPD) blamed their coalition with CDU for their worst ever election result and initially refused to form a coalition with Merkel.

Angela Merkel, however, had to pay a high price for forming the coalition with the SPD. According to the agreement between the CDU and SPD, the new Finance Minister will be a Social Democrat and SPD will decide six ministerial positions before the expected Bundestag vote on 14 March.


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