The U.S. President Trump to Arrive in Japan on Sunday

President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump arrive at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, Friday November 3, 2017, and board Air Force One en route Hawaii. This is the first day of a 12 day Asia trip. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)
President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump arrive at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, Friday November 3, 2017, and board Air Force One en route Hawaii. This is the first day of a 12 day Asia trip. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)

The U.S. President Donald Trump is expected to arrive in Japan on Sunday in his long twelve days Asia tour.

This is the longest Asia tour by any U.S. President in more than half a century. President Trump’s tour, according to a White House Statement will “demonstrate the Administration’s commitment to the Indo-Pacific region and to strengthen U.S. alliances and partnerships.”

The U.S. President Trump will land in Japan tomorrow to discuss “a wide array of strategic issues” with the Japanese leader “including the North Korean nuclear threat.”

President Trump and Prime Minister Abe are expected to work on “strengthening international resolve to denuclearize North Korea.”

Meanwhile, both Trump and Abe warned a hardline stance against the North Korean regime over the last few months. Besides the threats to ‘destroy North Korea totally’ threats by Trump, the U.S. top officials have unequivocal that “all options are on the table” on the North Korean issue.

The “all options on the table” phrase definitely include a preemptive military attack to diffuse nuclear and missile test by the North Korean regime.

The Japanese Prime Minister Abe has almost an identical hardline against the North Korean regime as the U.S. President Trump.

The Japanese PM Abe won the recent election by a massive margin with a promise to reform the longstanding pacifist Japanese constitution to protect the country from the North Korean aggression.

Japan has been marinating a pacifist constitution after the World War II defeat by diffusing its military’s role in the protection of the peace and security of the country.

The Japanese Prime Minister Abe is seen too enthusiastic to draw the Japanese military back on the front line to confront the North Korean challenges.

Shinzo Abe thus won the snap elections with a supermajority after he promised to reform the pacifist Japanese constitution. The ruling coalition won 312 out of 465 seats in the Japanese Parliament.

This supermajority in the snap elections is big enough to push through Shinzo Abe’s ambitious agenda.

 “My immediate task is to deal with North Korea. It will take tough diplomacy. With the mandate given by the people, I would like to exercise my command in diplomacy.”

Abe said he believed the missing Japanese citizens have been kidnapped and held in North Korea.

“I will pursue decisive and strong diplomacy to tackle North Korea’s missile, nuclear and abduction issues and put further pressure to get it to change its policy,” he said.

Now on his visit to Japan, the U.S. President Trump will “reaffirm America’s unshakeable alliance with Japan as they face the North Korean nuclear threat.”

The international relations experts believe a stronger stance and steps might be taken after the bilateral meeting between the two leaders in Tokyo to de-escalate the longstanding Korean tensions.

 


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