Salvadorians to Lose Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

Immigrant rights organizations gathered for an event near the White House to ask for the continuation of Temporary Protected Status Photo: University of Kansas
Immigrant rights organizations gathered for an event near the White House to ask for the continuation of Temporary Protected Status Photo: University of Kansas

The permits that allow around 200,00 people from El Salvador to live and work in the United States has been decided to be canceled.

The Trump administration has announced to cancel their permits four months after the government revealed its plan to scrap the Obama-era’s Daca scheme that protected undocumented young immigrants from deportation.

According to the latest announcement, the Salvadorians now have until September 9, 2019, to leave the U.S. or the government will arrange deportation.

These people were granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) in 2001 when two massive earthquakes destructed the lived of Salvadorians.

Tens of thousands of Haitians and Nicaraguans have already lost TPS protection under the Trump administration in the recent months.

The protections for the Salvadorians expired on Monday. They have been in the united states since the earthquakes in 2001 that killed around a thousand people.

The government has assigned the Congress lawmakers until March to decide the fate of the ‘Dreamers’ who are almost 800,000 to count under Daca scheme.

“To allow for an orderly transition, the effective date of the termination of TPS for El Salvador will be delayed 18 months to provide time for individuals with TPS to arrange for their departure or to seek an alternative lawful immigration status in the United States, if eligible,” Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen M. Nielsen said in a statement.

He said the government of the United States “determined that the original conditions caused by the 2001 earthquakes no longer exist. Thus, under the applicable statute, the current TPS designation must be terminated.”

The step will affect lives of around 200,000 Salvadorians who has been living and working in the U.S. for years and they may possibly face deportation and thus separated from their families.

The question what happened to the children who were born in the U.S. remains unsolved as they are also on the brink of facing deportation.


Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*