Ex-UN Peacekeeper Patrick Hector Gullan Accuses Croatia of Harbouring War Criminals

A combo picture shows different stories from the siege of Sarajevo in May, 1992, including General Ratko Mladić (top right), UN peacekeepers at the airport in Sarajevo and the Executive Council Building (Zgrada Izvršnog Vijeća) in the centre of the city after it was hit by a Serb tank shell. Photo by Mikhail Evstafiev.
A combo picture shows different stories from the siege of Sarajevo in May, 1992, including General Ratko Mladić (top right), UN peacekeepers at the airport in Sarajevo and the Executive Council Building (Zgrada Izvršnog Vijeća) in the centre of the city after it was hit by a Serb tank shell. Photo by Mikhail Evstafiev.

In an open letter, an ex-UN Peacekeeper, Patrick Hector Gullan has accused Croatia of harboring indicted war criminals and urged to send them back to Bosnia to face trial.

Mentioning names of some suspected criminals Gullan addressed the people of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina and Prosecutors at Hague. He said, “Former Bosnian Croat fighters Ivan Ancic and Vid Palameta, both accused of war crimes, are living in Croatia.”

“With the forthcoming verdict on 29 November by the Hague Tribunal on the appeal by the former six senior political and military leaders of the short-lived Bosnian Croat statelet called Herzeg-Bosna… I believe it is pertinent to raise ‘the Stolac case’ once again,” Gullan wrote.

But Gullan said that “sadly, no progress has been made in cases relating to the extradition of Bosnian Croats who are indicted for war crimes by the state court in Bosnia and who are living in Croatia”.

The authorities in Zagreb clearly remain determined to avoid allegations that Croatia played an active part in the Bosnia conflict,” he added.

Gullan Accused  Palameta, Ancic and several other suspects of being “key middlemen who went about the business of physically establishing the Herzeg-Bosna statelet, as envisaged by the six senior political and military leaders currently appealing in The Hague against their sentences.”

“Please do all you can to bring ‘the Stolac case’ to a satisfactory conclusion in the law courts. Without justice and the truth about what happened being told there will never be proper reconciliation,” he added.

Meanwhile, the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network (BIRN) said, “Gullan has been calling for Bosnian Croat war criminals to be brought to justice for many years; in 2001, he headed an investigation into the intimidation of Bosniaks displaced by the war who were trying to return to Stolac. The report called for the arrest of 22 people for post-war violence and intimidation and for the ethnic cleansing of Bosniaks during the 1992-95 conflict.”

Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, however, doesn’t extradite citizens accused of war criminals to each other, Balkan Insight reported.


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